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Smile

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When Healthcare Works For Us

There is more to heath, then Covid-19

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health healthcare life-lessons medicine self-improvement

When Healthcare Does Its Job

An Essay On Health That’ll Bring A Smile

PublicDomainPictures; Pixabay

I title this piece with what seems like a pretty obvious statement. It’s a clear cut fact, and I would sure hope that nobody out there would disagree with such a clear claim. That isn’t the mission of where I want this article to go. I write this instead as a way to humor readers, and truly find out for myself, if I’m not the only that’s thinking this way. So let me tell you a brief story.

This coronavirus journey has been going on now for literally, several months. And like most, I go through my everyday ways, living very vigilant of the places I go, the people I’m around, and mostly, the way I feel. Health wise, I am more cautious than ever before, and I think my subconscious at the very least, is suspicious at every throat tickle, every brief cough, blown nose, every sluggish moment, etc etc. It doesn’t always remain at just my subconscious mind either. Plenty of times, I am openly and consciously aware of the way I’m feeling (or not feeling).

Eventually, the inevitable happened. I felt like I had a slight bug. Mostly congestion. Not really an official cough, but a constant perceived need to clear my throat vigorously. Each time that throat clearing was bringing up plenty of multi colored phlegm.

Geralt; Pixabay

First off, I knew I didn’t have the coronavirus. Second, I knew from past experience, that there was no point in going to the doctor, if this issue was still barely new. It has come to seem that doctors have no interest in these type of things that are under the two week mark. So, I went on with my daily living. I felt confident that this throat clearing, cough issue would work itself out.

As the weeks went on, it lingered. It certainly wasn’t getting worse, but it was hanging around way too long. Since I was still able to bring up beautiful colors of junk, I realized that for as textbook as this type of issue is, I almost had a minor fear about telling anyone, and second, about calling up to make a doctors appointment. Reason being, and the problem is, society has become so Covid-19 crazy, that they think they themselves might have corona, and someone next to them, who is clearing their throat and coughing most definitely must be is full blown covid mode.

It’s a whole new type of hypochondria. It’s such a strange time. And for as much as we are more worried about catching coronavirus, we seem to have this bigger than usual fear to actually call the doctor.

Geralt; Pixabay

We literally, fear the answer, fear the results, we fear bad news, and we question good news.

I found myself rattling my brain, first off, by wondering why the hell I can’t clear this phlegm, and secondly, why can’t I just call the damn doctor. Strangely enough, I actually have a physical scheduled in three weeks. Which I wasn’t prepared to have early, because of the preplanning bloodwork, and the lack of available appointments.

Now there have been occasional times in my life where I’ve avoided my own doctor. I love her, and I’ve loyally had her as my primary doctor for over 15 years. But she’s tough at times. And I don’t always feel like I have the energy for her. Especially when the issue may just be quite routine.

Good news is, there is an urgent care center 10 minutes away from me, that takes my insurance, with a copay of $0. So they are my go-to quick results type of place, and even though it makes me feel like I’m cheating on my primary doctor, the level of convenience is just too great to cease this habit of mine. As long as I pop in to my regular doctor a minimum of once a year for a physical, everybody’s happy.

Mikepata; Pixabay

I find myself going to the website of the urgent care center to see about what their pandemic protocols are. Behold, on the main page, I see a big ad giving information about a temporarily virtual service that is available. First I was cautious of the idea. I wondered with curious suspicion, what the catch might be. How overly difficult may it still be? Can they really help me in a convenient way? That old mindset of instant gratification was showing itself ever so slightly in my thinking.

I gave them a call, answered their questions about my history, and what the problem was that had me calling. After a couple of minutes of that, they were ready to have me do a video conference with a physician within 15 minutes. Amazingly, with such ease, I was able to speak to a doctor, tell him my complaints, let him hear the sounds of my cough/throat clearing, and he hit it right on the money.

The call was done, and I was on the road, heading to my pharmacy to pick up some medications the doctor called in. It seemed so easy. It was a stress free way to end 4 weeks of yellow phlegm.

Username 463636; Pixabay

It was if the entire process from start to finish, took as long as it took you the reader to get to the end of this article here. Once in awhile the system somehow works for us, and as much as the system is usually getting the last laugh on us, this time around, I got exactly what I needed.

I hope this story has brought a smile to your faces. I had fun writing it, and now that I’m wrapping it up, I am very glad that I chose to author this account of my adventure in healthcare yesterday.

It is a good feeling to seek results, find those results, and be back home and happy, now that I know I am actually gonna feel better. It’s been an annoying month, and I am ready to shake off this congestion. The sooner I get well, the sooner the people around me won’t panic in wonder about what I really have (or don’t have).

Thank you for reading,

MICHAEL PATANELLA

Geralt; Pixabay

Michael Patanella

is a Trenton, New Jersey Author, Publisher, Columnist, Editor, Advocate, and recovering addict, covering topics of mental health, addiction, sobriety, mindfulness, self-help, faith, spirituality, Smart Recovery, social advocacy, and countless other nonfiction topics. His articles, publications, memoirs, and stories are geared towards being a voice for the voiceless. Hoping to reach others out there still struggling.


When Healthcare Does Its Job was originally published in ILLUMINATION on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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health healthcare life life-lessons medicine

HIPPA

Whose rights are they anyway?

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